Bengali Dal (Lentils) - thrive360
Pulses are the edible seeds of legumes. Think lentils, chickpeas, dry beans and dry peas. Pulses are also one of the hottest food trends of 2016. Top 5 reasons to eat pulses: High in protein and fibre (and other nutritious goodies) Can cut your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes Can help you get to a healthy weight Affordable i.e. wallet friendly (gotta love that!) Environmentally friendly (they actually add nutrients back into soil)
edible seeds of legumes, lentils, chickpeas, dry beans, dry peas, recipe
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Bengali Dal (Lentils)

Bengali Dal (Lentils)

Did you know that the United Nations has declared 2016 as theInternational Year of Pulses?

 

What are pulses, you ask? They are the edible seeds of legumes. Think lentils, chickpeas, dry beans and dry peas. Pulses are also one of the hottest food trends of 2016.

 

Top 5 reasons to eat pulses:

 

  1. High in protein and fibre (and other nutritious goodies)
  2. Can cut your risk of heart disease, cancer and diabetes
  3. Can help you get to a healthy weight
  4. Affordable i.e. wallet friendly (gotta love that!)
  5. Environmentally friendly (they actually add nutrients back into soil)

 

Canada is one of the world’s largest producer of pulses. So show your true patriot love by eating more pulses and taking the #pulsepledge

 

I was invited to the Pulse Feast to kick off to the International Year of Pulses. Many delicious recipes were devoured, from a crunchy chickpea/kale salad, lentil beef short ribs, to Cheddar split pea biscuits. I’ll be sure to share those recipes when I get my hands on them.

 

In the meantime, here’s a recipe from my mom’s kitchen – Bengali dal (lentils). Dal is a staple in Bangladesh and every household has its own version. It’s meant to be a side dish eaten with rice, but you can enjoy it as a soup.

 

You can also vary the consistency – from thin and runny to thick as porridge.

 

 

Bengali Dal (Lentils)

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 8 Cups

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • ½ tsp ground coriander
  • ¼ tsp cayenne
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 2 cups split red lentils
  • 6 cups water (more to adjust consistency to your liking)
  • 1½ tsp salt (or to taste)
  • handful of cilantro (approx. ⅓ cup)
  • 1 plum tomato, chopped
  • 2 cups frozen mixed vegetables, thawed
  • 1 green chili (optional)
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  •  

Instructions

  1. In large pot, heat canola oil.
  2. Cook onion for 4-5 minutes until softened.
  3. Add spices and lentils. Stir to coat lentils.
  4. Add water, cover and bring to boil.
  5. Reduce heat and let lentils simmer for about 10 minutes, until it looks soft.
  6. Add salt, cilantro and tomato. Cook for 5 minutes until tomatoes soften.
  7. Puree with a hand blender. Add water to adjust thickness to your liking.
  8. Add vegetables and green chili. Cook for 5 minutes. Turn off heat and add lemon juice.
  9.  

Notes

Eating this nourishing dal recipe is like getting a great big, warm hug. Perfect for cold, rainy days or when there's arctic temperatures paralyzing the outside.

Author: Zannat Reza Recipe type: Soup

 

Have you made dal? What ingredients do you use?

 

  • Zannat
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